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Electrified Aircraft Propulsion (EAP) for Larger Aircraft

Overview

EAP NASA Evolution of Thought showing Hybrid Wing Body (HWB), Tube and Wing large aircraft and Tube and Wing and Fixed Wing Vertical Take Off and Landing (VTOL) small aircraft demo to near/mid term goals of 2035 EAP Entry Into Service for Single Aisle and New Aircraft Market to mid/far term Small and Large aircraft come together with full Distributed Electric Propulsion and on-board electrical storage.
NASA Evolution of Thought
Single Aisle Aircraft Level System Studies
Study Pax Speed, Mach Airframe EAP Electrical
power,
MW
Propulsion
NASA STARC-ABL 154, 0.8 Tube and wing Partial Turboelectric 2 to 3 2 turbofans and 1 aft motor-driven fan
Boeing SUGAR Freeze 154, 0.7 Tube and truss brace wing Partially Turboelectric
(fuel cell)
50 2 turbofans and 1 aft motor-driven fan
NASA N3-X 300, 0.84 Hybrid wing body Turboelectric 16 aft motor-driven plans
ESAero ECO-150 150, 0.7 Tube and split wing Turboelectric 50 16 wing motor-driven plans
Boeing SUGAR Volt 154, 0.7 Tube and truss brace wing Parallel Hybrid Electric 1.3 or 5.3 2 motor-assisted turbofans
Rolls-Royce 154, 0.7 Tube and wing Parallel Hybrid Electric 1 to 2.6 2 motor-assisted turbofans
UTRC 154, 0.7 Tube and wing Parallel Hybrid Electric 2.1 2 motor-assisted turbofans

Benefits/Challenges

Aircraft Configurations

Research

Electric Machines

Continuous
power rating, MW
Specific
power goal,
kW/kg
Efficiency
goal,
%
Motor
type
Speed Nominal
dimensions
University of Illinois 1 13 >96 Permanent magnet 18,000 Cylinder 0.45 m by 0.12 m
Ohio State University 2.7 13 >96 Induction 2,500 Ring 1.0 m by 0.12 m
NASA Glenn Research Center 1.4 16 >98 Wound field 6,800 Cylinder 0.40 m by 0.12 m

Converters

Continuous
power rating,
MW
Specific
power goal,
kW/kg
Efficiency
goal,
%
Topology Switch material Cooling
General Electric 1 19 99 3 level SiC/Si Liquid
University of Illinois 0.2 19 99 7 level GaN Liquid
Boeing 1 26 99.3 Si Cryogenic

Materials

Test Capabilities

An electric aircraft power system test facility (NASA Electric Aircraft Testbed (NEAT)) has reached operational status at NASA Glenn Research Center. NEAT is being used to perform both industry partnership testing and in-house NASA R&D. NASA Glenn also has a range of test capabilities for EAP components, for example, in the area of magnetic materials. The correct building blocks are in place to have a viable large-plane EAP configuration tested by 2025 leading to entry into service in 2035.

EAP Resources

The EAP team has a wide selection of resources available. Explore the link below to locate technical documents and presentations.

Publications


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